The Arrow Collar Man

The Arrow Collar Man… an early advertising concept and model that preceded the Marlboro Man. From Wikipedia:

The Arrow Collar Man was the name given to the various male models who appeared in advertisements for shirts and detachable shirt collars manufactured by Cluett Peabody & Company of Troy, New York. The original campaign ran from 1905-31 though the company continued to refer to men in its ads and its consumers as “Arrow men” much later.

The Arrow Collar ads were a collaborative production of New York ad agency Calkins and Holden; Cluett, Peabody advertising director Charles Connolly; and commercial illustrator J. C. Leyendecker… President Theodore Roosevelt referred to him as a “superb portrait of the common man”.

He was what American men aspired to be, and most importantly, he always had on the right shirt.

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Some of my favorite images. Note that the man is not the focus of these – he is just the backdrop for the shirt and the woman in front of him (as it should be, when you’re wearing formal clothing).

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Later ads referring to the Arrow Collar Man.

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